Human Resources News & Insights

EEOC’s latest, best 10 tactics for preventing harassment in the workplace

The EEOC is looking to publish enforcement guidance to address illegal harassment in the workplace. That guidance is being built around several tactics the agency’s suggesting employers take to address this problem. 

EEOC: Yes, you have to protect employees from this too

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) accused this employer of making a big mistake, and the employer is now paying $250,000 for it. 

EEOC explains rights of employees with mental health conditions

The EEOC continues to issue resource guides for employees suffering from various health conditions to let them know the job protections and benefits available to them under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). But while the guides are written for workers, employers can learn a lot from them. 

Check your health plan: EEOC says denying this coverage is now discriminatory

Excluding a certain type of coverage from your company’s health plan has officially become risky business — even though it’s possible the same couldn’t have been said about this exclusion a few years ago. 

‘Attendance point’ policy costs employer $1.7M

It starts out as a simple challenge: Companies need a way to track employee attendance. 

EEOC issues new discrimination guidance: 11 changes to pay attention to

The EEOC is supplanting a 14-year-old section in its compliance manual with a brand new set of enforcement guidance. 

Discriminating against disabled workers, applicants costs utility $1.6 million

Employers feared that disability discrimination cases would skyrocket after Congress passed the ADA Amendments Act a few years ago. Those fears are being realized. And the cost of the latest disability discrimination settlement: almost $1.6 million.  

The EEOC’s 2016 performance report, by the numbers

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) secured more than $482.1 million for victims of discrimination in private, state and local government, and federal workplaces during fiscal year 2016, which ended Sept. 30, the agency reported.  

Why it’s going to get a lot easier for workers to file charges against you

As if you didn’t already have enough reasons to stay on employees’ good sides. Now the federal government is making it easier for disgruntled workers to file charges against their employers. 

GINA violation costs home care provider $125K

It’s official: The feds are serious about protecting employers from prying into their workers’ genetic backgrounds.