Human Resources News & Insights

ADA dilemma: Did over-accommodating disabled worker leave company trapped?

Say a well-meaning manager wants to do the right thing for a disabled worker and winds up offering an accommodation that goes above and beyond what the ADA requires. Then, when management changes, a different manager decides the arrangement is no longer feasible. Is the company bound by law to continue providing that accommodation?

Everything HR needs to know about new ADA guidance

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) just unleashed over 40 pages of revised guidance on a handful of disabilities that many HR pros deal with regularly. In case you don’t have time to slog your way through it all, here’s an extensive overview.

How this firm’s flex-time came back to bite it in disability case

If you’re one of the thousands of companies that offer flex-time, this new disability decision will likely be of special interest.

Do you know the potential ADA pitfalls in your hiring process?

Here’s a prime example of how tricky the hiring process can get when the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) comes into play.

Irony alert: Firm that helps the disabled settles disability bias claim

It’s not always easy to tell how far you have to go to accommodate a disabled employee. But perhaps a company that makes its living helping the disabled should have known better than this.

EEOC cracking down on new disability rules

The Equal Opportunity Commission is flexing its muscle to enforce Congress’s broadening of the definition of disability under the ADA. 

The decision: Was it legal to fire the employee?

Did the company successfully defend its decision in court?

Court: Even a sensitive nose can be a disability under ADA

When is a medical condition serious enough to qualify as a disability? It’s one of the toughest questions HR has to answer — and setting the bar too high can wind up getting a company dragged into court.

She left work and never came back — can she still sue for bias?

Sometimes employees who feel they’ve been discriminated against quit before the matter’s resolved. Can those employees still sue for discrimination?