Human Resources News & Insights

20 jobs for which pay is increasing most

If your company is looking to take on or retain employees in any of these positions, get ready to pay more than you expected to. 

The following 20 jobs are far outpacing the national average for salary increases, which currently sits at 2.2%.

This list was compiled by job site Glassdoor, which provides job seekers with salary figures sorted by position, company and location to help them in their job search.

Glassdoor looked at position-specific salaries in 2014 and compared them to this year’s salary figures to find these 20 jobs for which pay is increasing the most (sorry, HR isn’t one of them):

  1. Business systems analyst. Average pay in 2015: $83,300 — a 10% jump.
  2. Security officer. $24,000 — a 7% jump.
  3. Sales consultant. $49,008 — a 7% jump.
  4. Pharmacy technician. $26,000 — a 6% jump.
  5. Barista. $23,600 — a 6% jump.
  6. Customer service manager. $34,780 — a 5% jump.
  7. Certified nursing assistant. $25,000 — a 5% jump.
  8. Financial analyst. $71,550 — a 5% jump.
  9. Systems analyst. $80,000 — a 4% jump.
  10. Research scientist. $85,000 — a 4% jump.
  11. Programmer analyst. $79,638 — a 4% jump.
  12. Personal banker. $41,861 — a 4% jump.
  13. Branch manager. $63,500 — a 4% jump.
  14. Research associate. $51,948 — a 3% jump.
  15. Project engineer. $75,000 — a 3% jump.
  16. Cashier. $18,000 — a 3% jump.
  17. Cook. $20,000 — a 3% jump.
  18. Web developer. $68,407 — a 3% jump.
  19. Network engineer. $87,903 — a 3% jump.
  20. Software engineer. $105,000 — a 3% jump.

This is a pretty good indication of how in-demand people to fill these jobs are. It also serves as a benchmark for your salaries — to make sure they’re in the ballpark of what candidates are expecting.

Glassdoor recommends its users use its salary tool to make sure they’re getting fair compensation. But employers would also be wise to use this tool to see what job candidates and workers are being told they should be making. This can help you prepare communications explaining why you’re offering more or less than a candidate or existing employee thinks they should be paid, should the issue come up.

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