Human Resources News & Insights

The do’s and don’ts of ADA accommodations: 3 new rulings

Employers are facing more disability discrimination lawsuits than ever – despite their best compliance efforts. 

Court ruling highlights when alcoholism is and isn’t ADA-protected

A recent ADA lawsuit shows that saying you are disabled and proving it in court are two very different things. 

Can you refuse to hire someone because they’re fat? Courts say ‘yes’

In an era in which just about everything is regarded as a disability, at least two courts have stepped forward and labeled one major condition as NOT being a disability. Which means employers have some freedom on how to deal with it. 

Arbitrary maximum leave policy, disability discrimination costs retailer $8.6 million

Think the feds aren’t serious about enforcing laws against disability discrimination? Check this: A recent case is going to cost home improvement retailer Lowe’s a cool $8.6 million.

Meet 2 nominees for Worst Manager of the Year

You may have dealt with pranksters in the past, but you’ve probably never dealt with what these two managers made their employees endure. 

New minefield in your screening/hiring process: Prescription meds

Would you hire an applicant who admits he/she takes methadone? The answer might be a little trickier than you thought.  

Threat to kill is a fireable offense, right? Not so fast, court rules

If an employee makes a remark that suggests he’s thinking of killing a co-worker, firing him’s a reasonable response, correct? A court just ruled it may not be a legal one if it can be shown the firing was triggered by a disability (cue the groans from employers).

Sony cancels ‘The Interview’ – and violates the ADA (says the EEOC)

The holiday season hasn’t been kind to Sony Corporation of America. 

First case of Internet addiction: The fallout for HR and the ADA

We may have just been introduced to the next disability du jour that could have employees asking for accommodations. 

Being a jerk isn’t an ADA-qualifying disability, court rules

Employers can breathe a sigh of relief. Common sense just won the day in a U.S. appeals court.