ADA Reasonable Accommodation Requirements: Complying with the Law

You may already know that Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires employers to provide reasonable accommodation to qualified individuals with disabilities – unless to do so would cause undue hardship. But, how up to speed are you and your managers on the current law, equipped to identify a qualified employee, and how to handle employee accommodation requests?

Many webinars just explain the nature of accommodations required under the ADA. Here’s a problem – they are “light” on how to actually address those accommodations as a matter of policy and ongoing practice. This “how-to” rich 60-minute webinar focuses on how you can meet your obligations under the accommodations portion of the ADA while protecting your organization from “undue hardship.” Join us to address:

  • Understanding the ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA) and what constitutes a disability
  • What you should & shouldn’t say when addressing issues of disability
  • What constitutes as “undue hardship” for an organization
  • Keys to determining if an employee has a qualified disability
  • Balancing providing reasonable accommodations with managing the business

Program Highlights

Defining Disability & Employer Obligations Under Reasonable Accommodation

  • When an applicant or employee must be offered an accommodation
  • What employees needing accommodation DON’T have to say or ask
  • Analyzing the true meaning of an “undue hardship”

Do’s & Don’ts When Addressing Disabilities & Reasonable Accommodations

  • Formulating an adequate reasonable accommodation
  • Questions to avoid asking during a pre-conditional job offer interview
  • Can you force an employee to seek a medical opinion regarding a suspected disability?
  • Language to avoid in verbal statements, emails and letters to applicants or employees
  • Negotiating the accommodation: How to find the right balance for all parties

ADA Regulations & Requirements Employers Need to Know

  • Initiating and engaging in the ADA’s accommodation “interactive process”
  • When a medical professional’s letter requires you to provide an accommodation
  • Significance of ADA’s “Direct Threat” exception to the accommodation requirement

Live Question & Answer Session – Have your questions answered by the expert!

Program Benefits

This webinar is short on theory and long on practical approaches to complying with the ADA’s accommodations mandates related to both job applicants and existing employees. Learn what employers should and shouldn’t do under the current laws.

About the Speaker

Max Muller has more than 40 years of business experience as an attorney, businessman and professional trainer.

  • In 1990, drawing on his diverse background, he began a consulting practice focusing on providing practical solutions in the areas of workplace legalities, e.g., equal employment opportunity, sexual harassment, FMLA, ADA, COBRA, FLSA, ADEA, etc.; safety and health regulatory compliance (OSHA); facilities management; and, warehousing/inventory control.
  • He authored several books like “The Manager’s Guide to HR: Hiring, Firing, Performance Evaluations, Documentation, Benefits, and Everything Else You Need to Know, Second Edition” AMACOM Books (now HarperCollins Leadership) and SHRM, New York City, August 2013.
  • He has presented more than 3,000 seminars, webinars and pod-casts all over the world attended or listened to by more than 100,000 people.

Purchase this On-Demand Webinar

ADA Reasonable Accommodation Requirements: Complying with the Law

On-Demand Recording
$199

If you can’t make it live, no worries!
You’ll receive the recording and materials after the event.

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